Monday, September 01, 2014 596-SURF , 596-WAVE , 922-BONG , 638-RUSH , 572-SURF(MAUI) , 241-SURF (KAUAI) , 324-RUSH (BIG ISLAND)
   
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4/20-4/26. On 5/18 off 5/30. off 8/6
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Too many jetskis at Teahupo'o - when is it enough?

With the amount of Jet Skis and testosterone buzzing around Teahupo’o during last week’s swell, you could’ve assembled a navy that would match Uruguay’s in any ocean-born conflict. The photos made it look like war — an army of crews fighting to gain the same blue territory. And while most of us struggle with getting an average wave at Lowers on a crowded day, we can hardly fathom how to safely squeeze one from last week’s motorized crowd in Tahiti. Peter Mel, the 2013 champ of Mav’s and your favorite webcast announcer, breaks down how to battle and when it’s time to wave the white flag. –Brendan Buckley

PETER MEL: Last week’s swell was somewhat chaotic and very dangerous at times. When a set would come in, everybody would stand up at the same time and sort of jockey for position. Whoever was in the best spot, depending on who they were, usually got the wave. There was no, “Hey, you go!” or any communication like that. It all boiled down to knowing who’s who and being able to make decisions based off of that.

Basically, the Tahitians had priority no matter what. They had full reign over whatever wave they wanted, and rightfully so. It seemed like the Hawaiians were next in line, then everyone else was kind of below that. You had to play a little bit of hardball to get waves but it was basically like how it works at any other surf spot. The locals are up first and if they want the wave, they’re going to end up with it.........

 

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